Northern Illinois University MFA Exhibition

Master of NoneOpening  Fri.  April 5,  6-9pm 

Note!  This exhibition is at ARC’s new location: 1463 W Chicago Ave   

Master of None is an exhibition of Master of Fine Arts Graduates from Northern Illinois University.

Exhibiting Artists:
Sasha Bitzer
Shane Bowers
Terrance Gray
Noah Kashiani
John Linquist
Samantha Mendoza
Natalie Pivoney
Emily Rangel-Cascio
Zeinab Saab
Daniel Stetzinger
Xingyi Tan

Opening Reception, Friday, April 5, 6:00-9:00

  • Exhibition dates: Apr 5-27, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed to Sat 12-6 pm, and Sun. 12-4 pm  

Call for Entries – Frayed: Fiber Beyond Craft

FRAYED: Fiber Beyond Craft
JUROR: Jade Yumang
Apply HERE
 
Fiber works — from embroidery, stitching and sewing, to weaving and felting— have, throughout history, been relegated to the genre of craft and to ‘women’s work.’ Since the late sixties and early seventies, however, the women’s movement has broken through that pigeonhole, as many talented artists turned to Fiber as a form of expression that extended way beyond Craft. As ARC calls for work that uses Fiber as a seminal aspect of expression, we look to further “fray” the boundaries of this evocative medium.
 
With arms open, we welcome artists of all gender orientations to apply to the juried show entitled “FRAYED: Fiber Beyond Craft”
 
Break Every Fiber in Me
 
There’s nothing worse
than feeling bad and not
being able to tell you.
Not because you’d kill me
or it would kill you, or
we don’t love each other.
It’s space. The sky is grey
and clear, with pink and
blue shadows under each cloud.
A tiny airliner drops its
specks over the UN Building.
Everything sees through me,
in the daytime I’m too hot
and at night I freeze; I’m
built the wrong way for the
river and a mild gale would
break every fiber in me
 
– Frank O’Hara, “Nocturne”, 16-19
 
By facing the ordinariness of everyday life and its emotions, the poet Frank O’Hara goes through the ambiguous space of fleeting memories not as a form of sentiment, but a space of constant change. That unstable mindset of subverting the banal can be seen through how fiber is manipulated, sewn, stitched, woven, looped, pieced, stuffed, embellished, dyed, and felted into visual cues that takes you to an uncanny field.
 
Fiber art now goes beyond the worn-out craft vs. art debate and is a lot more integrated into modes of making work. The potential of using techniques that we habitually encounter on our daily lives primarily through touch then highlighting that fundamental affect into transformative work is robust and boundless.
 
Subsequently, fiber art is a conduit that is adapted to grasp evolving implications able to tackle subjects including but not limited to personal narratives, formal abstractions, body works, and political underpinnings. Its conceptual weight is the ability to upend ubiquitous techniques and materials to craft different perspectives and/or break its expectations.
 
A Juried Exhibition at ARC Gallery, Chicago. Wed, June 26 to Sat, July 20, 2019
 
FEES: $40 for one to three images. $10 for each additional image (lower charge for students–High school or college students can pay a reduced fee of $25 per 3 entries with $10 for each additional entry (Please include copy of Student ID))
 
If paying by check, it must be received prior to jurying.
 
CALENDAR: All dates are 2019
Deadline for Submission of Applications: Sat, May 5 at 11:59pm CST
Notification of Acceptance: Will go out by email Sat. May 26.
Work Delivered to ARC: Wed-Sat , June 19-22, 12-6pm
Exhibition Dates: Wed. June 26, 2019 – Sat. July 20, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, July 28 from 6pm – 9pm
 
Apply HERE

Call for Entries “His-ter’-ee-uh”

A juried exhibition in March 2019 at ARC. Click here for prospectus and application form.

New exhibit at ARC Gallery, March 2019, juried by artist Olive Stefanski. (NEW DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS! —Jan. 26th, 11:55 pm)

With this exhibition, we are calling for art that addresses structural sexism—in particular, women’s emotional realities, and how that emotional reality plays out in a national atmosphere of distrust about women’s stories, women’s rationality and women’s anger.

His-ter’-ee-uh: from the Greek word “hystera”, or womb—an organ that was thought to migrate erratically through a woman’s abdomen, searching for “fragrant smells”, much like “an animal within an animal”. (Aretaeus, Greek physician, 2nd century AD)

While the uterus has become more sedentary over the intervening years, it nevertheless continued to be blamed for women’s irrationality and emotional distress. In the 19th century, a time marked by both physical constraints (corsets) and psychological restrictions (confinement to womanly activities), widespread concerns about female hysteria resulted in numerous cures for misbehaving wombs. A popular treatment for hysteria at the time was clitoral stimulation administered by one’s physician.

Today, in the inevitable backlash to the “MeToo” moment, women once again are distrusted, disdained (and sometimes diagnosed) for an emotionality that threatens the status quo. Women’s bodies continue to be the ground around which much of the conflict revolves. Strangely enough (as we saw in recent Supreme Court hearings) some of the hysteria around these events now seems to also emanate from men, which suggests the need for a new metaphor to explain the cause of women’s rage.

application form and prospectus: https://arcgallery.wufoo.com/forms/ahistereeuha/