Cheri Reif Naselli

INTERIORITY:  Opening Reception Fri.  May 31, 6-9pm

This work, my work, is a glimpse into an interior life and ongoing conversations – wondering, searching, thinking, feeling, collecting, solving, hoping, listening, wandering, finding, questioning, more thinking, learning, panicking, walking, seeing, forever searching, visual thinking on paper and in space – resulting in this exhibition.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, May 31, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: May 29 – June 22, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Chiyeko Yuki

Here’s to Life:  Opening Reception Fri.  May 31, 6-9pm

Spring is here again after the long, severe winter. The seasons come around. Eight years have passed since the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami took away the lives of more than 18,000 people and swept away everyday life along the coasts.

After the terrible tsunami,  a single pine tree, which had once been a part of a large forest, was the only tree left standing. It was called “the miracle pine” and it initially survived the summer heat, the blowing seawater winds, and the cold snow. It encouraged people and gave them hope to survive. Its roots, however, had been fatally exposed to seawater and it finally died one year after the tsunami. People started to work on a big project to apply special treatments to keep the wood from decaying before restoring it to its original site. By using cloning technology, efforts have been made to create offspring of this miracle pine. It has become a symbol of the recovery and survival efforts of the people in this region.

I have come to the realization that there is something we must hand down to later generations and to the future world. On the exact day of the Big Tsunami I was in bed, in the hospital after surgery. However, I am now here and I am able to enjoy my art and my life again. These small pieces of art are my everyday “journals”. They are my way of life shown in Light and Shadow.

I am writing this on Mother’s Day and I feel a sense of gratitude. My 98-year-old mother helps me cut the paper for my art. I feel thankful for my family and my friends. I am also grateful to the ARC artists who continue to encourage me to make art.

Opening Reception, Friday, May 31, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: May 29 – June 22, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Nelson W. Armour

Beyond:  Opening Reception Fri.  May 31, 6-9pm

In the series “Beyond” the images are meant to imply, to suggest, or to infer. Each environment is unique and the image aims at transcending the immediate setting into another realm. The viewer is invited to enter this territory and discover a new dimension.

These images seek to evoke mood, tension, and the unknown. While much of my work is rooted in reality, this series starts from a specific location but ends somewhere else. We live in times where the issue of what is real and what is not real is thrust upon us. This work invades this terrain.

Opening Reception, Friday, May 31, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: May 29 – June 22, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Call for Entries “His-ter’-ee-uh”

A juried exhibition in March 2019 at ARC. Click here for prospectus and application form.

New exhibit at ARC Gallery, March 2019, juried by artist Olive Stefanski. (NEW DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS! —Jan. 26th, 11:55 pm)

With this exhibition, we are calling for art that addresses structural sexism—in particular, women’s emotional realities, and how that emotional reality plays out in a national atmosphere of distrust about women’s stories, women’s rationality and women’s anger.

His-ter’-ee-uh: from the Greek word “hystera”, or womb—an organ that was thought to migrate erratically through a woman’s abdomen, searching for “fragrant smells”, much like “an animal within an animal”. (Aretaeus, Greek physician, 2nd century AD)

While the uterus has become more sedentary over the intervening years, it nevertheless continued to be blamed for women’s irrationality and emotional distress. In the 19th century, a time marked by both physical constraints (corsets) and psychological restrictions (confinement to womanly activities), widespread concerns about female hysteria resulted in numerous cures for misbehaving wombs. A popular treatment for hysteria at the time was clitoral stimulation administered by one’s physician.

Today, in the inevitable backlash to the “MeToo” moment, women once again are distrusted, disdained (and sometimes diagnosed) for an emotionality that threatens the status quo. Women’s bodies continue to be the ground around which much of the conflict revolves. Strangely enough (as we saw in recent Supreme Court hearings) some of the hysteria around these events now seems to also emanate from men, which suggests the need for a new metaphor to explain the cause of women’s rage.

application form and prospectus: https://arcgallery.wufoo.com/forms/ahistereeuha/